In the Media

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In the Media

Commentary: The bill for biotech

By Dan Murphy

One of the most persistent images of African agriculture is the iconic photos of dusty, drought-stricken fields where crops are withering under the Sub-Saharan region’s blazing sun. Indeed, much of Africa is drought-prone, which complicates food production for millions of subsistence farmers who are dependent on rainfall to sustain their crops.

English

Strict bio-safety law stalls GM maize trials

By Al-amani Mutarubukwa
BusinessWeek Reporter
Dar es Salaam. Tanzania is still lagging behind in conducting confined field trials for genetically modified (GM) maize compared with other East African countries, says a researcher.The situation is mainly attributed to country’s strict bio-safety law.

 “We have had successful mock trials since 2009, but we failed to move to the next step last August because the government did not grant us a permit,” the Water Efficient Maize for Africa (Wema) project country coordinator Alois Kullaya told BusinessWeek recently.

English

Gene from Japan for local maize

Daily Nation, 19 May 2010

The ammonia-like smell and slimy texture of soybeans fermented with bacteria is a combination that is craved by many Japanese, as this dish, known as natto, is said to nourish the brain, prevent high blood pressure and to keep the skin young.

It is said hungry Japanese warriors once resorted to eating rotten soybeans when, exhausted from war, they found that the cooked soybeans they had wrapped in straws and brought as battle rations had gone bad. With time, natto became a staple in the breakfast diet of millions of Japanese people.

English

Tanzania: Shifting towards drought resistant agriculture

Makwaia Wakuhenga - opinion

Tanzania is poised for a scientific revolution to defeat one of its worst weather vagaries - drought – if tests to fertilise maize seeds biotechnologically prove successful.

A scientific conference which I followed in Johannesburg last week organised by the 'Water Efficient Maize for Africa' (WEMA) regional project revealed a rising enthusiasm by East and Southern African states to make this agricultural revolution which may mean sustained growth of Africa's staple food, maize.

English

New hope to end scourge of drought

When the Bacillus subtilis bacteria is injected into an ordinary maize seed, an interesting event occurs; the leaves of the fully grown maize plant curl up in dry conditions thus losing less water to evaporation and making this mutant staple crop virtually resistant to the crippling droughts that have plagued Africa for centuries.

English

New maize to curb hunger

Kampala — There is maize being harvested in all corners of Uganda. According to the Ministry of Agriculture, this is likely to be the biggest maize harvest in a very long time.

The harvests would be even better, if two new maize varieties that may change the face of maize production in the region had already hit the farms. The two varieties, the Water Efficient Maize for Africa (WEMA) and the Drought Tolerant Maize for Africa (DTMA) are currently under going field tests in the East African region.

English

Mock planting of first GM maize

An African saying cautions that when you have eaten your fill, you should cover your stomach. Economists who study behaviour say rich nations have for years been doing the opposite. The richer they get, the more wastefully the people eat.

English

GM maize for local trials by 2010

Daily Nation, 18 June 2009

Kenya will soon start confined field trials of drought-tolerant transgenic maize variety in a project spearheaded by Kenya Agricultural Research Institute. The project funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation is in the process of seeking regulatory approval for the confined field trials from the National Biosafety Committee (NBC).

English

Dans le point presse #1

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French

Dans le point presse #2

Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged. It was popularised in the 1960s with the release of Letraset sheets containing Lorem Ipsum passages, and more recently with desktop publishing software like Aldus PageMaker including versions of Lorem Ipsum.

French

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